Auto Immune Disease In Dogs Genetic Correlation? Puppy Strangles

Strangles. What on earth is that? Auto Immune Disorder

It is an autoimmune disorder in puppies. Symptoms occur between 3 weeks to 4 months of age. If left untreated it results in severe scaring and in rare cases, even death. Breeds susceptible to the disease include golden retrievers, Mini Daschshounds & Siberian Husky’s. It is not contagious and unlikely to recur once treated properly and quickly. With the combination of prednisone and an antibiotic, it will give your puppy the best chance for a full recovery.

The disease is also called juvenile cellulitis. The symptoms are as follows; swollen face, eyes, muzzle, sores on face, inside ears, mouth, and in severe cases it affects the anus and genital area. The sores may burst and crust over. If it involves the puppy’s ears, they will smell very foul. The puppy’s lymph nodes are also affected. Other symptoms are fever, poor appetite, and lethargy. Your puppy may also experience joint pain.

When diagnosing a puppy with strangles, It can sometimes be tricky because it does look like a staph infection which is a bacterial infection. To get an accurate diagnosis make sure your Vet takes a swab of the areas infected and examine it. Make sure it’s not mites, ringworm or any other skin issue or allergy.

8 Week Old Lab/Doodle Puppy. She had sores everywhere! Ears, nose, eyes, and all over her “private area”.

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Treatment involves aggressive autoimmune drugs, antiobiotics, to prevent secondary bacterial infections, and its very important to keep all lesions clean and dry. Ask you vet about a hydrogen peroxide diluted solution to keep the infected areas clean.

When your puppy is on the steroid, they will experience stronger than usual hunger. It’s a side affect of the medication. Some people will give them a little more food than usual, but NOT ALOT MORE. It’s important to keep him/her comfortable after all they are just babies and so dependent on their new owners. Keep the cone head on when ever possible. Excessive licking only adds to the problem.

The more I research this “RARE” issue in Labradoodle, the more I see people posting the same type of stories, so how rare is this actually?

This particular dog is much better now. She is 8 months old now and feeling and looking much better. She is no longer on steroid or any medicine. The condition was caught very early.

Staph Infection / MRSA In Eye

Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)  The name even sounds frightening. 

It is an infection caused by Staphylococcus bacteria.  It’s resistant to many antibiotics.  The bacteria lives in your nose naturally and on your skin.  It usually  does not cause any harm.  The issue starts with a break in your skin.  Then all hell breaks lose.  The bacteria multiply at a high rate of speed.  That is where the infection starts. 


MRSA is contagious and can be passed from person to person and it can also be transmitted by surface contact where the bacteria is.  It can kill you if not treated properly.  The nose is very close to the brain, therefore one needs to take serious action on this condition.   Oral antibiotics and sometimes even IV antibiotics are necessary.  


The infection is painful.  The affected area turns red, spreads quickly and hurts to even tough it.  It’s also warm to the touch.  It can be accompanied by fever, headache, muscle aches,  chills, fatigue, shortness of breath, and chest pain.  Oh and don’t forget a cough too.  



Here is a photo of what mine looks like.  It feels much worse than it looks.  At this time I do not have a “pimple”  however one should form soon.  This condition is also known as cellulitis.    Photo is day 3 of infection before antibiotics

Symptoms include rash, muscle aches, chills, fever, redness and swelling, cough, shortness of breath, fatigue and a headache.  Sometimes there is even a small pimple on the inflamed area. 

Risk factors include:  

Being in a nursing home or hospital

Weakened immune system

Share exercise equipment, towels or razors

Crowded unclean areas

Work in a daycare

Interesting Facts:

MRSA can live up to 8 weeks on the head of a mop

9 weeks on a cotton towel

Over 6 months on blankets

Prevention:

Wash Wash Wash your hands.  

Keep them away from your face especially your nose, mouth and eyes.  

Keep all wounds covered and clean

Bleach your towels and face cloths

Day 2 on antibiotics