Staph Infection / MRSA In Eye

Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)  The name even sounds frightening. 

It is an infection caused by Staphylococcus bacteria.  It’s resistant to many antibiotics.  The bacteria lives in your nose naturally and on your skin.  It usually  does not cause any harm.  The issue starts with a break in your skin.  Then all hell breaks lose.  The bacteria multiply at a high rate of speed.  That is where the infection starts. 


MRSA is contagious and can be passed from person to person and it can also be transmitted by surface contact where the bacteria is.  It can kill you if not treated properly.  The nose is very close to the brain, therefore one needs to take serious action on this condition.   Oral antibiotics and sometimes even IV antibiotics are necessary.  


The infection is painful.  The affected area turns red, spreads quickly and hurts to even tough it.  It’s also warm to the touch.  It can be accompanied by fever, headache, muscle aches,  chills, fatigue, shortness of breath, and chest pain.  Oh and don’t forget a cough too.  



Here is a photo of what mine looks like.  It feels much worse than it looks.  At this time I do not have a “pimple”  however one should form soon.  This condition is also known as cellulitis.    Photo is day 3 of infection before antibiotics

Symptoms include rash, muscle aches, chills, fever, redness and swelling, cough, shortness of breath, fatigue and a headache.  Sometimes there is even a small pimple on the inflamed area. 

Risk factors include:  

Being in a nursing home or hospital

Weakened immune system

Share exercise equipment, towels or razors

Crowded unclean areas

Work in a daycare

Interesting Facts:

MRSA can live up to 8 weeks on the head of a mop

9 weeks on a cotton towel

Over 6 months on blankets

Prevention:

Wash Wash Wash your hands.  

Keep them away from your face especially your nose, mouth and eyes.  

Keep all wounds covered and clean

Bleach your towels and face cloths

Day 2 on antibiotics 

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